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About the Dominion

What is the Dominion?

The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada since May 2003. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. The Dominion can be read online, or delivered to your doorstep as a print subscription.

The Dominion is a project of Canada's first media cooperative, jointly owned and democratically controlled by its readers, contributors and editors.

Why is it called the Dominion?

Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

Why is the Dominion important?

The vast majority of media in Canada is owned by a handful of corporations. For example, CanWest Global, the largest Canadian media company, controls over 30 per cent of the Canadian media. The consolidation of corporate control and ownership in Canada has resulted in a decrease in investigative journalism, an increase in the number of stories journalists are expected to produce and a narrowing in the range of debate on key issues of importance.

The Dominion aims to widen the range of debate by covering stories marginalized, spun, or simply ignored by the mainstream press. As an independent publication relying primarily on reader support rather than advertisers, the Dominion represents a new model of newspaper in Canada, created unambiguously for the public good, rather than for maximizing profit.

How do Dominion stories differ from those found in the mainstream media?

The Dominion's aim is not just to report that something is the case, but to examinewhy it is the case. By providing context to stories, and giving voice to perspectives that are marginalized and those most affected by events or decisions, the Dominion hopes to promote understanding through accurate, in-depth reporting.

Readers of the Dominion will find a range of articles on Afghanistan, for example, that offer perspectives virtually nonexistent in the mainstream press. Our coverage spans the spectrum of debate from "We need to help the Afghans by sending more troops," and "We need to stop Canadian causalities by bringing the troops home," to "Is Canada's involvement making things worse in Afghanistan?," "Does Canada owe reparations to Afghanistan?" and "What is the foreign policy that's guiding Canada's decisions in Afghanistan?" Our coverage brings critical historical context to the war in Afghanistan, rather than focusing only on daily violence and Canadian casualties. Our coverage gives voice to Afghans through on-the-ground reporting, rather than the generals and politicians given prominence in mainstream reports from the greenzone.

Climate change is another example of an issue that has had the parameters of public debate limited by the mainstream press. Despite what was virtually a scientific consensus--that climate change was real and caused by humans--most media focused on the 'debate' of whether or not action should be taken. The Dominion has recognized climate change as an issue of critical importance since the publication began and has featured several stories on its impacts and solutions.

Today, climate change is getting much more coverage in the mainstream press, but debate remains limited. The Dominion's stories on climate change as an issue connected to race, power, and corporate influence are vitually absent in the mainstream media.

Where the above examples illustrate occasions where the mainstream press fail to report on particular angles or perspectives, there are other examples where an entire issue remains absent from the pages of the news.

The Dominion has featured extensive coverage of Canada's involvement in Haiti before and after the coup that ousted the country's democratically elected leader in 2004. Canada's involvement in the coup and much of the violence that has followed has been well documented in the Dominion through groundbreaking research and accounts from journalists working on the ground in Haiti.

Is the Dominion biased?

We believe all media are biased. Every time a reporter chooses a story, chooses who to interview, chooses what questions to ask, he or she is revealing a bias. Much of the coverage in the mainstream press is biased towards the rich and the powerful. For example, articles in the business section of the Globe and Mail focus on how rich people are making more money and rarely cover the impacts corporations are having on labour rights, the environment, social inequality, First Nations land rights, etc.

Where mainstream media makes false claims of 'balanced' and 'unbiased' coverage, the Dominion is explicit about its bias: we are biased towards the perspectives of those most affected by events, government policy and corporate activity.

Who contributes to the Dominion?

Some of the contributors to the Dominion are experienced journalists, but many others have had no previous experience. We believe, that with some guidance from our editors, anyone with a desire to research, ask questions and relate a story can write an informative account and contribute to the available body of information. If you're interested in writing:
learn more.

Where is the Dominion located?

Everywhere! Our writers and editors are spread out across Canada and around the world. The Dominion does not have an office, though our main centres of activity are in Montréal, Québec, Toronto and Ottawa, Ontario, Vancouver, BC, and Tatamagouche/Halifax, Nova Scotia. If you'd like to get in touch, you can write to:

The Dominion
PO Box 741
Station H
Montreal, QC
H3G 2M7

Alternatively, send us an email.

Why doesn't the Dominion post stories more regularly?

We would love to post stories more regularly, and we have no shortage of independent journalists ready to do the work. Currently, however, we cannot pay for most of the articles we post, and therefore the number of people who can write for us is limited. Please become a member or donate to the Dominion to support independent journalists and journalism.

How is the Dominion funded?

Primarily by people like you! The Dominion has also received some small grants over the years and has limited advertising revenue (guided by our advertising policy).

Interested in advertising in the Dominion?

Contact us and we'll discuss our advertising policy.

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The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

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