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April 6th, 2004

April 6, 2004 Accounts

Impressions from Haiti

haitians_fp.jpgAnthony Fenton shares his impressions from a ten-day trip to post-coup Haiti

April 6, 2004 Comics

Clerk Fatigue

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"Clerk Fatigue," by Heather Meek

April 6, 2004 Features

Divide and Conquer: Bilateral Trade Agreements

The US is using a new approach to sidestep developing countries' unified demands

patiotrasero_fp.jpgLast September saw the spectacular collapse of World Trade Organization treaty talks in Cancun, Mexico. Joseph Stiglitz, former Chair of Clinton's council of economic advisors and Nobel Prize winner described the talks as "the usual: hard bargaining, extreme positions, last-minute concessions, arm twisting, peer pressure, tacit threats of cutting off development assistance and other benefits, and secret meetings among a small number of participants are all designed to extract concessions from the weakest".

by Yuill Herbert

The US is using a new approach to sidestep developing countries' unified demands

April 6, 2004 Environment

Direct Action: Tre Arrow Arrested

trearrow_fp.jpgOn March 10th, a man calling himself Joshua Murray was arrested for shoplifting in a Victoria Canadian Tire outlet. According to police, fingerprints identified him as Tre Arrow, an Oregon environmental activist listed on the FBI's most wanted list with a reward of $25 000 for information leading to his arrest.
- by Dru Oja Jay -

FBI labels prominent anti-logging activist as "eco-terrorist"

April 6, 2004 Arts

The Art of Second Language Conversation

kvetdiagram_fp.jpgWhen I talk to my new friend Tom, we're not just talking-- we're metatalking. When I ask him how he's enjoying the weather, he tells me he is not enjoying it at all because it has too many future tenses. "Will it rain?" he asks me. Then answers himself, "In the afternoon it may begin to rain." "It will soon be raining."
- by Linda Besner -

March 16th

March 16, 2004 Features

Is "Fighting to Win" a Criminal Act?

OCAP's John Clarke on the "Queen's Park Riot" and the changing rules of class warfare

[From a talk given by John Clarke in Halifax last December, at a public discussion on the criminalization of dissent.]

John Clarke at an OCAP demonstrationIf we're talking about the criminalization of dissent, the first thing that must occur to us when we look at those kinds of examples is that we live in an insane world, where people who go out and challenge injustice are the ones who must defend themselves from the charge of being criminals.

When we marched on the Legislature, back in Toronto, we were aware that so far that year, 22 homeless people had died on the streets of Toronto. When it comes to the crimes of the G7, even the known ones would fill volumes. Those that we don't know about would probably fill volumes more.

To say that anyone who stands up against such acts of theft and murder and violence - and fights back against them - must defend themselves from the charge of being criminal is astounding, and insane. We should keep that in mind.

OCAP's John Clarke on the "Queen's Park Riot" and the changing rules of class warfare

March 16, 2004 Accounts

Venezuela's Political Battle

chavez_flags_fp.jpgDavid Fuenmayor reports on Venezuela's deep political divide, US intervention, and issues surrounding a potential referendum.

March 16, 2004 Comics

Neighbour

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"Neighbour," by Heather Meek

March 16, 2004 Arts

On to the End: Geoff Berner

svec_fp.jpgGeoff Berner has played in a punk band. Geoff Berner has written for Sesame Street. Geoff Berner plays the accordion and prefers to drink scotch out of a wine glass. The canuck's latest release, We Shall Not Flag or Fail, We Shall Go on to the End, has quickly gotten the attention of campus radio stations across North America and Europe. The record features his trademark stew of diverse and previously incompatible styles.
- by Henry Svec -

March 16, 2004 Environment

A New Era in Conservation

boreal_evans_fp.jpgThe Canadian Boreal Initiative (CBI), launched at the end of last year, is a common vision for the largest conservation agreement in the world. It proposes a plan to protect approximately 265 million hectares of forest and to manage a further area of equal size according to stringent ecological standards of development.
- by Yuill Herbert -

February 25th

February 25, 2004 Canadian News

Canadian News: February 25

February 25, 2004 Accounts

Privatization in South Africa: Starting Over

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Less than a decade after the end of Apartheid in South Africa, popular resistance movements are growing again. This time, the enemy is privatization.

February 25, 2004 Comics

Snow

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"Snow," by Heather Meek

February 25, 2004 Features

Paul Martin, Ethics and Democracy

An Interview with Democracy Watch's Duff Conacher
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by Dru Oja Jay

Duff Conacher is the Coordinator of Democracy Watch, an Ottawa-based group that has advocated for "democratic reform, government accountability and corporate responsibility" for a decade.

What can we learn from Paul Martin's past record on ethics and democratic reform?

That Martin has lied about maintaining high ethical standards, that he has broken ethics rules, and that he surrounds himself with corporate lobbyists, all of whom are representing corporations that have specific private interests that are not the public interest. And so he is tied directly to the private interests of several corporations in Canada.

by Dru Oja Jay

An Interview with Democracy Watch's Duff Conacher

February 25, 2004 Arts

Brief Notes on Death and Writing

I recently had the misfortune to watch a man die on the street.

One result of this experience is that I started thinking about Ernest Hemingway. In the early pages of Death in the Afternoon, his famous journalistic account of the bullfights in Spain, Hemingway explains why he wrote it: "I was trying to learn to write, commencing with the simplest things, and one of the simplest things of all, and the most fundamental, is violent death."

by Matthew Trafford

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The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

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