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December 1st

December 1, 2003 Environment

Growth at Any Cost

miami_vice_fp.jpg"NAFTA on steroids" a site for protest and paramilitary-style police action

On November 20th, behind five ranks of riot police, a 10 foot high reinforced fence, water cannons, and light armoured vehicles, ministers representing thirty-four countries agreed to a "lite" version of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA). - by Yuill Herbert -

“NAFTA on steroids” a site for protest and paramilitary-style police action

November 10th

November 10, 2003 Accounts

Privilege and Responsibility

"Privilege confers responsibility and the people who are called intellectuals, for no particularly good reason, happen to be privileged."

November 10, 2003 Features

Freedom of the Press is for Those Who Own One

irving_fp.jpgThe Irving Media Monopoly in New Brunswick

Living in New Brunswick where all of the English language daily papers are owned by one company means that there is very little variety in the type of news that is available to New Brunswick readers. We face classic problems of monopoly media ownership in which homogeneity and a narrow range of opinion are common features of the news media.

- by Erin Steuter -

The Irving Media Monopoly in New Brunswick

November 10, 2003 Comics

Mondays

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"Mondays," by Heather Meek

November 10, 2003 Canadian News

Video Solidarité

November 10, 2003 Accounts

Journalists Question Media Ownership in Canada

"Media concentration is worse in Canada than in other industrialized countries; in New Brunswick, way worse."

November 10, 2003 Environment

Harvest Goon

fatalharvest_fp.jpgFatal Harvest: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture: Review
Our connection to the environment is perhaps most apparent when we sit down at the dinner table to eat a meal. That "we eat our daily bread without being conscious of the massive loss of topsoil, diversity and farm communities involved in its production" testifies to North American's disconnection from the land that sustains us. It is this disconnection that is allowing corporations to hide the very real and terrible impacts of the industrialization of our food supply, and it is this disconnection that Fatal Harvest: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture addresses.

Fatal Harvest: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture: Review

November 10, 2003 Arts

A Serious Lack

artist'scallforjustic_fp.jpgAmerican Visual Artists and Bush's War
I have to admit that the abundance of American flags bothered me when I first came to New York a few months ago. And the bumpers stickers saying 'God Bless Our Soldiers' didn't ease my mind much, either. But I breathed a sigh of relief whilst walking past the offices of the faculty of my fine arts program; on almost every door was an anti-war poster from the internet.

American Visual Artists and Imperialism

November 10, 2003 Arts

Can'tLit

Books Recently Seized or Detained by Canada Customs
"The past 20 years have shown Canadian censorship to be legal, durable, and popular. Canadian censors--whether government officials or common citizens-- have shown little confidence of the abilities of other people to think or behave responsibly after reading 'objectionable' books and magazines."

Books Recently Seized or Detained by Canada Customs

October 20th

October 20, 2003 Features

"Anybody but Bush"

Canada-US relations and the next Presidential election

anyonebushbush_fp.jpgThe relationship between Canada and the US has been rocky since George W. Bush took office. Some have blamed this on a personal disconnect between Jean Chretien and President Bush. For example, in March 2003 Liberal MP David Pratt said "I don't think things will change until our leadership changes"--i.e., when Chretien leaves office. Many pundits and politicians agree with Mr. Pratt.

But is this realistic? Exactly how does the relationship between a Canadian Prime Minister and a US President affect Canada-US relations--and how might upcoming federal elections in both countries change the situation?

- by Susan Thompson -

Canada-US relations and the next Presidential election

October 20, 2003 Accounts

Snapshot of an Occupied Land

Jon Elmer of From Occupied Palestine.org reports on curfew enforcement in the West Bank town of Jenin.

October 20, 2003 Arts

Mail Order Tielli: Infinite Joy from a Subscriber's Perspective

tielli_fp.jpgIt was a chance I was happily willing to take. Apparently, so the story goes, Martin Tielli's close friends and acquaintances assured him that one cannot simply unload four albums of music on the listening public in one skull-cracking whump. Thus, it was decided to bleed out this music one record at a time. To help finance the project up front, subscriptions were sold; each subscriber would receive four albums over the course of one year. The project would be named Tielli 2003: a fitting tag for what looked to be an epic undertaking.
- by John Haney -

October 20, 2003 Environment

Cheam People Shut Down Railway and Halt Logging

cheam_fp.jpgAt about 4 pm on October 2nd two trucks pulled to a halt while straddling the railway tracks that bisect the Cheam Reserve. A small crowd, including members of the Cheam Nation and supporters from local communities, gathered around the trucks forming a human blockade against the trains. Earlier that day, elder and former Chief June Quipp had warned Canadian National Railways that trans-Canadian train travel would be halted, and that she was good on her word.
- by Yuill Herbert -

A saga of resistance

September 27th

September 27, 2003 Canadian News

Anti-Hate Legislation Passed

September 27, 2003 Comics

The Secret Office

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"The Secret Office," by Heather Meek

September 27, 2003 Features

The "Piquetes"


buenos-aires_fp.jpgWhen Argentina's economy collapsed in January of 2002, thousands of Argentinians lost their jobs, and others lost their life savings when foreign banks closed suddenly. In the face of massive unemployment which existed well before the collapse, unemployed workers formed collectives to democratically petition the government for temporary employment ("plans"). After being consistantly ignored, the poorest of the unemployed, often starving, began to set up roadblocks (piquetes) on important Argentinian roads in support of their demands for work. They have also set up bakeries, bartering systems, and occupied abandoned factories and restarted business as usual--without the owners and with a radically democratic model of organizing.

A conversation between the Situaciones Collective and multiple members of the Unemployed Workers Movement of Solano. Translated by Ivan A. and eleusa.

Argentina's unemployed build direct democracy for basic needs

September 27, 2003 Arts

Paul Martin, Meet Shakespeare

petruccio_fp.jpgRecently a friend suggested I check out Paul Martin's online opinion survey about the Canadian definition of marriage. Also recently I saw an all-female production of The Taming of the Shrew performed in that Shakespearian Mecca, London's Globe Theatre. And perhaps oddly, these two things have quite a lot to say to each other.- by Jane Henderson -

September 27, 2003 Arts

What's the Art For?

After 17,000 years of accumulating examples of art, people are still asking, "But is it art... what is art?" Can't we answer that question by now? - by Max Liboiron -

September 27, 2003 Environment

The Swoosh Swoops into Mountain Equipment Co-op

mec_fp.jpgNike AGC cross trainers arrived on the shelves of Mountain Equipment Co-op's only Atlantic Canadian outlet this August. Canada's largest cooperative is confident in Nike's commitment to greener products, sustainable practices and international labour codes. "They're not perfect, but are certainly putting lots of effort and resources into changing their ways," says MEC's CEO Peter Robinson.- by Norma Jean MacPhee -

September 12th

September 12, 2003 Comics

Black Creek Pioneer Village

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"Black Creek Pioneer Village", by Heather Meek

September 12, 2003 Environment

North America in the Dark: the Blackout in Context

blackout_fp.jpgOn August 15th, 50 million people in the United States and Ontario found themselves in the dark, but many argue that North Americans have been 'in the dark' about the global context of their energy consumption for far too long. The 'biggest blackout in history' can shed some light on the inequalities of global energy consumption. The course that policy makers chart in the future must stretch beyond blackouts to looming problems that face all societies across the globe.

- by Yuill Herbert -

September 12, 2003 Arts

New Brain Machine Improves Musical Creativity

face_fp.jpgYes, you read the headline correctly, and no, I can't believe it either, but apparently scientists have invented a brain machine that dramatically enhances musical performance, thus paving the way for a new race of highly skilled super-musicians. According to the BBC, "the system - called neurofeedback - trains musicians to clear their minds and produce more creative brain waves. Research, to be published in the journal Neuroreport, indicates the technique helps musicians to improve by an average of 17%...

-by Matt Brennan -

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The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

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