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December 21, 2015 Weblog:

Opinion: Haiti’s Electoral Shambles, CEP Officials Can Either Fix the Mess or They Go to Jail

By WADNER PIERRE

For too long, people paid by Haitian people to do their job have not been held accountable. Now, it’s the time for the Haiti’s electoral officials – the Conseil Electoral Provisoire (CEP) – to either fix the electoral mess or go to jail.

It is despicable that a CEP official threatened to shut down the whole electoral process instead of collaborating with a government-backed commission to investigate massive electoral frauds that they fail to avoid. Marie Carmelle Paul Austin, a member of the electoral council, told a radio in Haiti’s capital that the electoral council members are ready to depart in bloc “If this commission’s purpose is to redo or verify the work that the CEP has already done, the council members will resign.” What Madame Austin did not say is that when you betray your people, violate your country’s laws and contribute to social and political destabilization you should be in jail.

For too long, Haitian people have been struggling for participative democracy and social justice. They’ve been ignored by Haitian officials who primarily seek to satisfy the interest of their international backers like the United States, Canada and France by either plotting electoral coups. Although the Martelly administration finally established a commission to address the latest electoral disaster, it is uncertain that anything will come of it.

Martelly himself was a beneficiary of an electoral fiasco. How can one believe he will accept any recommendation asking the removal of his handpicked candidate? This move reminds me of an article by Haiti’s renowned author Edwidge Danticat: Sweet Micky and the Sad Déjà Vu of Haiti’s Presidential Elections.

» continue reading "Opinion: Haiti’s Electoral Shambles, CEP Officials Can Either Fix the Mess or They Go to Jail"

December 19, 2015 Weblog:

Haiti Elections: Catholic Church still Undecided whether to join the Govt.-formed Electoral Commission or Not

BY WADNER PIERRE

Nearly two months since Haiti’s Conseil Electoral Provisoire (Electoral Provisional Council), know as the CEP, announced the final results for the first round residential, second round legislative and local elections that plagued with massive frauds. The controversial results for the presidential elections placed Haiti’s ruling Party candidate, Jovel Moise at the first place with over 34 percent of the popular and the former 2010 presidential candidate Jude Celestin in second place. Since then protest against those tainted results have been widened through the country.

After candidates and their backers, religious leaders (Catholics and Protestants) and national and international human rights and advocacy groups urged the CEP to form an independent commission to investigate the electoral frauds that were no longer mere allegations, the CEP rejected such proposition and proceeded to schedule the presidential runoff on Dec. 27 with the two candidates obtained the majority of the vote. Celestin, a member of group of eight presidential candidates, known as G8, who have been protesting the CEP’s results, declared he would not participate at the runoff unless the CEP satisfied the demand of G8.

The United States, a staunch supporter of the current administration, and spent over $30 millions for the organization of these log-overdue elections, sent Kenneth Merten, the U.S former ambassador to Haiti and State Department’s Special Envoy to Haiti to convince candidates, most importantly Celestin, to accept the CEP’s results. Merten, a close friend of Martelly, and one the controversial figures that engineered Martelly’s election in the 2010 controversial elections, failed to his mission.

» continue reading "Haiti Elections: Catholic Church still Undecided whether to join the Govt.-formed Electoral Commission or Not"

December 18, 2015 Weblog:

Haiti: Govt. Formed an Electoral Commission to End Electoral Deadlock; Will the CEP Reschedule the Runoff?

BY WADNER PIERRE

Since the CEP published its tainted and most controversial results for the presidential, second round legislative and local elections early last November, thousands have been demonstrated in the streets of Haiti’s largest cities to reclaim a recount of their votes. Religious leaders and international human rights and advocacy groups have also urged the CEP to investigate irregularities and massive electoral frauds that are no longer mere allegations.

As protests widening, diplomatic talks failed and G8 candidates remaining steadfast in their position, to remedy the situation, Haiti’s PM Evans Paul in an one-page letter sent to the President Michel J. Martelly, proposed a formation of an electoral commission to ensure the credibility of the already festered electoral process.

The commission according to the Prime Minister’s letter will have three days to produce recommendations to the government and the Conseil Electoral Provisoire (Electoral Provisional Council), known as the CEP. The head of the government stated,“ …it is necessary to organize credible, transparent, participative and inclusive elections,” as well as “to do whatever it takes” to create a climate of trust for the actors involving in the process.

The CEP shows no sign that it will abide by the recommendations of the government-formed commission. One of its members Marie Carmelle Paul Austin told a radio in the Haiti’s capital that the electoral council members are ready to depart in bloc should the commission interfere in their work. “If this commission’s purpose is to redo or verify the work that the CEP has already done, the council members will resign,” implied council Austin.

» continue reading "Haiti: Govt. Formed an Electoral Commission to End Electoral Deadlock; Will the CEP Reschedule the Runoff?"

December 18, 2015 Weblog:

Haiti: CEP Failed to its Mission, But an Electoral Miscarriage Can Be Avoided

By Wadner Pierre

This article was originally published by UnlessWeCare.org

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 6.34.24 AM It has been over a month since Haiti’s Conseil Electoral Provisoire (Electoral Provisory Counsel), known as CEP, published its foreknown controversial fraudulent results for the first round presidential and second round legislative elections. The CEP’s preliminary results for the presidential elections placed President Michel Martelly’s hand-picked candidate Jovenel Moise of Parti Haïtien Tèt Kale, or P.H.T.K in the first place with 32.8 percent of the popular votes. Jaccéus Joseph, a member of the electoral council, qualified the results as unacceptable.

Miami Herald’s Jacqueline Charles reported, Joseph refused to sign “the presidential and legislative preliminary results” because of irregularities and frauds that plagued them. Joseph thought his refusal to endorse the results would prompt the Tabulation Center to verify “the allegations of electoral fraud, including checking the voter registration lists against the ballots cast in the Oct. 25” elections to avert an unnecessary electoral crisis.

Joseph said, “We asked the director of the Tabulation Center did he have enough time to thoroughly verify if there was fraud.” According to Joseph, the director told them, “[H]e didn’t have enough time for that.”

Despite Joseph’s insistence on verifying and correcting the irregularities and frauds threatening the credibility of the results, CEP’s President Pierre-Louis Opont decided to publish the tainted results. The electoral crisis that was avoidable is now becoming an inevitable crisis. This man-made electoral dispute could further derail the political and social stability of the country.

» continue reading "Haiti: CEP Failed to its Mission, But an Electoral Miscarriage Can Be Avoided "

November 20, 2015 Cooperatives

The Extraordinary Possible

Beyond austerity, glimpses of climate justice and a democratic economy

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May 21, 2014

Immigrants Left High and Dry on The Rock

Lack of support forces newcomers out of Newfoundland

May 13, 2014 Cooperatives, Environment, Food

Coffee Industry Fails Farmers

Amidst the leaf rust Roya crisis, co-operatives and organic farming shine a light

May 6, 2014 Food, Governance, Labour, Migration

Blacklisting Migrant Workers

Guatemalans speaking out against abuse expelled from temporary foreign worker program

April 29, 2014 Cooperatives

Bye Bye, Mondragón

Winnipeggers lose community space after 18 years

April 28, 2014

In Memory of Ali Mustafa

April 17, 2014 Education, Peace/War

Higher-Calibre Education?

Uncovering the military applications of high-tech research at McGill University

April 10, 2014

Teach For Canada Gets Schooled

New educational charity sparks concern among Indigenous and non-Indigenous educators

April 8, 2014

Public Utilities Exporting Privatization

Manitoba Hydro involved in controversial power sector privatization in Nigeria and beyond

April 4, 2014

Golden Years Go Grey

Canada's pension fund heavily invested in dirty coal

March 28, 2014 Environment, Indigenous

Logging the Whiskey Jack

Grassy Narrows’ 11-year struggle faces new challenges

March 20, 2014 Solidarity

Canada Arms Mexico

As conflict in Michoacán carries on, Canadian companies serve Mexican Army

March 17, 2014 Housing

Snowbirds after the Storm

In post-crash Florida, Canadians are part of a growing class of landlords

March 12, 2014 Indigenous, Solidarity

Canadian Aid, Honduran Oil

Ottawa funds set to encourage oil investment

March 3, 2014

February in Review

Remembering missing and murdered women, the coup in Haiti, and the burgling of the FBI

January 21, 2014 Direct Action, Environment, Indigenous

Toyota Prius Not So Green After All

Algonquin fight threats to land and water from open-pit mining project for hybrid car batteries

January 14, 2014 Direct Action, Environment, Indigenous, Solidarity

Showdown in Elsipogtog

Seven months of shale gas resistance in New Brunswick

January 9, 2014 Environment, Indigenous

A Threat to Winnipeg’s Water Supply?

Activists raise red flags over lack of meaningful consultation around Energy East pipeline

January 7, 2014 Migration

Undocumented Labour

Changes to refugee health care put women and babies at risk

January 2, 2014

December in Review

Pipelines approved, posties perplexed, Prime Minister panders

December 23, 2013 Direct Action, Environment

Stopping the Flow

Line 9 organizing in context

December 2, 2013

November in Review

Fracking fights, trans rights, prisons hit new heights

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The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

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