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Guatemala

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October 19, 2011 Photo Essay

As Firm as a Tree

Portraits of Diodora Henandez, a woman in resistance against Canadian mining

August 3, 2011 Accounts

Prospecting the Terrain of Struggle

Fight against Guatemalan Goldcorp enters halls of power, leaves disappointed

March 23, 2011 Canadian News

Lies and War Crime

Guatemalan ex-military accused of war crimes held in Alberta prison

August 23, 2010 Photo Essay

Guatemalan Women Speak Out Against Rape

Soldiers, police, security terrorized residents who live in nickel-rich area

July 1, 2010 Labour

Raising the Flag for Union Rights in Guatemala

Bottle distributors trying to unionize face 2-year strike, 2 assassinations

June 8, 2010 Business

Goldcorp Drilled by Shareholders

Mining company challenged at AGM to respect host communities

June 2, 2010 Foreign Policy

Underground Diplomacy

Canada’s transnational mining industry implicated in abuses

March 21, 2010 Business

Guatemalan Coffee a Complex Blend

Threats, exile a bitter part of coffee farmers' work

Goldcorp shows little respect for local population

In the surroundings of San Marcos, Guatemala, the gold and silver mine of the Canadian Goldcorp Inc. which operates in Guatemala under the name Montana Explorada, has been ready for extraction since 2004. This is yet another blow for the environment and health of the communities of San Miguel and surroundings.

March 17, 2010 Mar 17 by LaRuta.nu
February 19, 2010 Foreign Policy

Murders in Mining Country

Canadian mining companies at the scene of the crimes

December 7, 2009 International News

Justice: Transparency or Incarceration?

150 years for forced disappearance a precedent, families not satisfied

September 30, 2009 Weblog:

Recent killings linked to Canadian-owned nickel mine in Guatemala

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Two Qeqchi leaders were shot and killed and over a dozen wounded this week near the site of a shuttered nickel mine in Guatemala.

The first shooting took place on Sunday, September 27 on land claimed by the community of Las Nubes, which Compañia Guatemalteca de Niquel (CGN), a subsidiary of Manitoba's HudBay Minerals, also claims to own.

Early reports indicated CGN's private security guards opened fire while attempting to remove families from their land. Adolfo Ichi Chamán, a teacher and community leader, was killed by gunshot, at least eight more wounded by bullets fired from an AK-47.

Prensa Libre, Guatemala's leading newspaper, reported that during Chamán's funeral service yesterday, thousands of people marched through the streets of El Estor, demanding that the company and the local police chief withdraw from the area within 24 hours.

HudBay released a lengthy statement yesterday claiming that there were no evictions, but instead that "protestors" went on a rampage, attacking government vehicles, a local police station (where they allegedly stole automatic weapons), destroying a hospital built by a coalition of US NGOs, and wounding five employees.

Hudbay goes on to make the absurd claim that the protesters proceeded to open fire on each other.

» continue reading "Recent killings linked to Canadian-owned nickel mine in Guatemala"

September 20, 2009 Weblog:

Reuters gets it wrong on Guatemala Mining Project

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Reuters reported Thursday that there is no start date planned for the Hudbay (formerly Skye Resources) nickel mining project in eastern Guatemala.

Can't say this is much of a newsflash. I reported extensively on the unlikelihood of the project moving forward over a year ago.

But Reuters correspondent Sarah Grainger really gets it wrong when she writes:

Skye Resources, which acquired the project in 2004, came up against local opposition to the reopening of the mine, with squatters occupying company land and burning down a hospital and community relations office built by Skye.

I guess Ms. Grainger missed the part about company goons burning people's homes during violent evictions. The evictions were widely documented. There is no excuse for such a serious error.

Members of the army provide back-up to Guatemalan police during the eviction of Maya Qeqchi people, carried out on behalf of Skye Resources. January, 2007. Photo by James Rodriguez.

September 9, 2009 International News

Guatemalan Court Sets Precendent in the Case of Israel Carias

Community remembers a leader who gave his life for the struggle

July 7, 2009 International News

From Memory to Resistance, Children Bear Witness

HIJOS celebrates 10 years in Guatemala

July 5, 2009 International News

Disputed Property Sale in Guatemala Results in Death Threats, Charges

Canada's Goldcorp agrees to negotiate; police, military arrive instead

April 5, 2009 International News

Not With Bullets or Machetes

Popular resistance to Xalala Dam finds international law on its side

January 9, 2009 Accounts

Disappeared Before the Courts

Internationals accompany witnesses to forced disappearance in Guatemala

December 27, 2008 Opinion

Mining the Island: An International Perspective

Struggles in Guatemala harken back to Cape Breton's mining boom

November 23, 2008 Literature & Ideas

Copper Ore, Silver Screen

Under Rich Earth

November 18, 2008 Foreign Policy

FOCAL Blasted for Ties to Mining Industry

Indigenous leaders pull out of mining workshops in Guatemala

November 17, 2008 Business

Heads They Win, Tails You Lose

Canadian companies will do anything for the big nickel in Guatemala

Violent Evictions at El Estor, Guatemala

In January 2007, hundreds of police and soldiers forcibly evicted the inhabitants of several communities situated on lands the Guatemalan military government granted Canadian mining interests in 1965. Backed by the army and the police, Canada’s Skye Resources paid workers to destroy people’s homes with chainsaws and torches.

November 11, 2008 Nov 11 by rightsaction.org

Sipakapa no se vende

On 13 June 2007, forty-two communities in a Guatemalan municipality called Ixchiguan said 'No' to destructive mining in their territories. In the referendum, local people rejected the mining exploration licenses given to mining companies without their consent.

November 11, 2008 Nov 11 by foei.org
April 26, 2008 Weblog:

Gerardi's Memory is Alive!

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"Knowing the truth is painful, but it is a highly liberating action" - Bishop Gerardi, April 24, 1998

Bishop Juan Gerardi was assassinated 10 years ago today. He was beaten to death with a concrete slab in front of his residence. His killers have never been brought to justice.

The assassination took place two days after the release of "Guatemala Nunca Mas" (Guatemala Never Again), the comprehensive document on the 36 year internal conflict in Guatemala put together by the Recovery of Historical Memory (REMHI) project of the Catholic Church.

Cardinal Rodolfo Quezada Toruño gave a powerful sermon in memory of Gerardi this morning in the Cathedral in Guatemala City. He received an extended round of applause when he stated that "the Catholic Church will not stop demanding that the case of Bishop Gerardi be clarified, until we know who was responsible for doing what."

Toruño finished the mass by stating that in remembering Gerardi, the Catholic Church is reaffirming that in Guatemala, they have taken a "fundamental option for the poor."

August 17, 2007 Photo Essay

Good As Gold?

"There is nothing to negotiate!" Guatemalan community wants Canadian mining company out.

May 3, 2007 Accounts

A Woman in a Mine’s World

National roundtable on mining fails those struggling against Canada’s corporations abroad

March 14, 2007 Weblog:

The "Reputational Imperative" of ILO 169

The International Finance Corporation, the private sector arm of the World Bank, has just released a new report on the International Labour Organization's Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention 169. The report is meant as a guide for the private sector "in relation to C-169."

The new IFC report basically sets up a "reputational imperative" for companies to comply with ILO 169, noting that "While a private company might feel the need to clarify that the law does not apply to it, a more fruitful approach may be to try to act in a way that is consistent with the principles of the Convention on issues such as consultation, land rights, and protection of indigenous peoples' cultures." (my emphasis).

» continue reading "The "Reputational Imperative" of ILO 169"

March 9, 2007 Weblog:

Intimidation, defamation and fear: Goldcorp in Guatemala

Vancouver based Goldcorp lodged a formal complaint today against Madre Selva, a Guatemalan ecologist collective, as well as against Flaviano Bianchini, an Italian biologist who carried out water quality studies near Goldcorp's Marlin mine in Guatemala. Bianchini's study found high levels of heavy metals, and the findings were released by Alvaro Ramazzini, the Bishop of San Marcos.

» continue reading "Intimidation, defamation and fear: Goldcorp in Guatemala"

March 9, 2007 Français

Les crimes du «développement» au Guatemala

Part 1 : Skye Resources et la réoccupation des terres au Guatemala

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