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Arts

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May 4, 2006 Arts

Portraits of Strength

WomanSky_fp.jpgMoira Peters talks to artist Marlon Garcia Arriaga about his paintings and the women of Panzós, Guatemala that inspire them.

The women of Panzós

March 26, 2006 Arts

The Life of A Clearcut

Ice_edit-fp.jpgMax Liboiron speaks to photographer John Haney about the process of art. Slow down and take a second look.

John Haney collaborates with his environment

February 27, 2006 Arts

Hot Politics

burlesque_fp.jpgAt Vancouver's International Burlesque Festival Jane Henderson and Edie Jackson find both progressive politics and old-fashioned desire.

Women are leading Burlesque's international revivial

January 10, 2006 Arts

Please Remember Music

soa.musicians_fp.jpgThousands sing for revolution at the School of The Americas Protest in Fort Benning, Georgia. Carole Ferrari joins the chorus.

Song plays a central role at the School of the Americas Protest

November 16, 2005 Arts

Card Carriers

card1_fp.jpg Max Liboiron looks at the issues raised by creative currency of Artist's Trading Cards.

Artist's Trading Cards (ATCs) are art for everyone

October 27, 2005 Arts

"Spiritual Wife" or Single Mother?

bank_fp.jpgDavid Sanderson reviews Banking On Heaven, a film on "Arizona's dirty little secret."

The film Banking On Heaven explores polygamy and religion in Colorado City

August 25, 2005 Arts

The Rising of The Rising

rising2_fp.jpg Why aren't Canadian media paying any attention to international bollywood blockbuster The Rising? Rajiv Rawat explains.

Canadian film critics pass on Bollywood blockbuster's hard look at imperialism

June 15, 2005 Arts

What's in a Name?

fiveosamas_fp.jpg In this interview, director Mahmoud Kaabour talks about how 9/11 affected tolerance, the making of "Being Osama", and why he left Canada.

An interview with "Being Osama" director Mahmoud Kaabour

June 8, 2005 Arts

Things Left Behind

found_cover_fp.jpg Jennifer Chrumka peeks at random artifacts from the personal lives of anonymous strangers in Found Magazine.

May 6, 2005 Arts

What's in a Graphic Novel?

boyle_fp.jpg In the wake of the first wave of graphic novels, Jane Henderson looks at some recent, disparate Canadian works.

March 24, 2005 Arts

Revaluing Value

copyright_warning_fp.jpg Max Liboiron looks at the Department of Behavioural Investigation's anti-copyright art movement.

The Condition of Copyright

February 17, 2005 Arts

The Architecture of "Basic Human Pleasure"

skateboard-mtl_fp.jpg Thanks to overzealous insurance agencies, skateboarders have been driven to the margins of cities. Dru Oja Jay looks at some proposed alternatives.

Godzilla vs. Skateboarder showcases the art and politics of skateboarding

January 26, 2005 Arts

Description and Excess

Review Editor Linda Besner talks to Montreal poet and critic Carmine Starnino about description and the fear of misappellation.

An interview with Carmine Starnino

December 19, 2004 Arts

Captivating Theatre Closes

Canada has just lost its only behind-bars theatre company that performs for the public. Jane Henderson discusses its life and death.

November 6, 2004 Arts

Yes Means No!

When international gatherings of corporate executives (mistakenly) ask the Yes Men to be their keynote speakers, they are only too happy to oblige. Max Liboiron watches the results.

The Yes Men dish up artistic critique to straight-faced corporate audiences

September 30, 2004 Arts

A Pleasing Demeanor

Chris Cwynar listens to Chris Demeanor's irreverent pop artistry.

This spirited Calgary native has finally found his zone.

August 25, 2004 Arts

Drawing a Response

Suddenly, drawing is in. Hype of the moment or a new art movement? Max Liboiron finds diagrams, computer inspired illustrations, and twists on pop culture in New York.

With simpler media, complex work appears

July 21, 2004 Arts

American Patriot from Guelph?

sam_turton_fp.jpg

Every movement needs a theme song.

June 24, 2004 Arts

Zen and the Art of Gender Maintenance

tootall_fp.jpgAre you really in love? Does your best friend really hate you? Are you an annoying person? There is now a new quiz on the market to help with an even more important question: What gender are you, really? Kate Bornstein's My Gender Workbook uses the artistically neglected literary form of the women's magazine quiz to address the realities of gender politics. Since the demographic that magazine quizzes usually address is overwhelmingly female, and a fairly specific spin on female at that, Bornstein's quiz creates a tension within women-focused "literature".

- by Max Liboiron -

May 27, 2004 Arts

Plunderphonics

greyalbum_fp.jpgMix the Beatles' The White Album with rapper Jay-Z's Black Album and what do you get? DJ Danger Mouse's experimental CD, The Grey Album. You also get a cease-and-desist order from EMI Music. Tracks from the 3000 now-illegal copies of this CD have spawned countless downloads and are just one of hundreds of examples in the current debate over what is art and what is piracy.

- by Jane Henderson -

April 6, 2004 Arts

The Art of Second Language Conversation

kvetdiagram_fp.jpgWhen I talk to my new friend Tom, we're not just talking-- we're metatalking. When I ask him how he's enjoying the weather, he tells me he is not enjoying it at all because it has too many future tenses. "Will it rain?" he asks me. Then answers himself, "In the afternoon it may begin to rain." "It will soon be raining."
- by Linda Besner -

March 16, 2004 Arts

On to the End: Geoff Berner

svec_fp.jpgGeoff Berner has played in a punk band. Geoff Berner has written for Sesame Street. Geoff Berner plays the accordion and prefers to drink scotch out of a wine glass. The canuck's latest release, We Shall Not Flag or Fail, We Shall Go on to the End, has quickly gotten the attention of campus radio stations across North America and Europe. The record features his trademark stew of diverse and previously incompatible styles.
- by Henry Svec -

February 25, 2004 Arts

Brief Notes on Death and Writing

I recently had the misfortune to watch a man die on the street.

One result of this experience is that I started thinking about Ernest Hemingway. In the early pages of Death in the Afternoon, his famous journalistic account of the bullfights in Spain, Hemingway explains why he wrote it: "I was trying to learn to write, commencing with the simplest things, and one of the simplest things of all, and the most fundamental, is violent death."

by Matthew Trafford

February 3, 2004 Arts

Lessons for an Audience

Kazimi's Shooting Indians questions "authenticity"
shooting_indians_fp.jpgIn Ali Kazimi's 1997 documentary Shooting Indians, a whole sequence of studying is going on. Kazimi studies Iroquois photographer Jeff Thomas, who is mining the century-old works of white photographer and filmmaker Edward Curtis. The three are transformed.
by Jane Henderson

Kazimi's Shooting Indians explores representations of authenticity

January 13, 2004 Arts

Satire Under Attack

When looking silly is worse than looking evil
newWar_fp.jpgWebster's Dictionary credits literature as the traditional medium to use "trenchant wit, irony, or sarcasm to expose and discredit vice or folly." Yet in today's multimedia world, satire has entered the mainstream via theatre, television, music, newspaper cartoons, radio, and the internet. Satire is an important tool for those frustrated by the corporate, sponsorship, and political agendas mixed up in their media.- by Jane Henderson and Max Liboiron -

When looking silly is worse than looking evil

January 13, 2004 Arts

An open letter to the National Magazine Awards Foundation

I am writing to express my disappointment at your decision to eliminate the poetry category in the National Magazine Awards. It seems to me that in doing so you are not only turning your back on the literary magazines that form an important part of your constituency, you are turning your back on journalistic tradition. - by Amanda Jernigan -

December 22, 2003 Arts

Democracy and Fascism

Myth, Propaganda and Disaster provokes controversy in Australia
reichstag_fp.jpgMyth, Propaganda and Disaster in Nazi Germany and Contemporary America: A Drama in 30 Scenes made headlines because each of the major theatres in Sydney failed to pick it up for 2004, even though it completed successful runs at both The Playbox Theatre in Melbourne and The State Theatre Company in Adelaide.
- by Lynda Ng -

Myth, Propaganda and Disaster provokes controversy in Australia

December 22, 2003 Arts

Proffessor Undressor

Sumi-E Experiment (2003)
Many of today's most acclaimed electronica albums are recorded in the cramped bedrooms of computer-literate music nerds. Meanwhile journalists have invented the curious genre of "laptop music" to describe the trend.
- by Matt Brennan -

Sumi-E Experiment (2003)

December 1, 2003 Arts

From Margin to Main Character

deafening_fp.jpgDeafening brings disability to the centre of mainstream fiction

I always get suspicious when in coffee shops, on buses, trains, and coffee tables, or peering out of purses, I see the same book. It seems that everyone except me is part of the same book club, and they've all picked up the assigned reading for the month. Not too long ago, this novel was The Life of Pi, and the ubiquity of this brightly coloured, incessantly discussed novel made me want to avoid it, for the sole reason that nobody else seemed to. - by Laura Cardiff -

Deafening brings disability to the centre of mainstream fiction

November 10, 2003 Arts

A Serious Lack

artist'scallforjustic_fp.jpgAmerican Visual Artists and Bush's War
I have to admit that the abundance of American flags bothered me when I first came to New York a few months ago. And the bumpers stickers saying 'God Bless Our Soldiers' didn't ease my mind much, either. But I breathed a sigh of relief whilst walking past the offices of the faculty of my fine arts program; on almost every door was an anti-war poster from the internet.

American Visual Artists and Imperialism

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The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

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