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October 10, 2009 Arts

A Poetic Ascent

Shugendo Now is a film for the cynic

November 23, 2008 Literature & Ideas

Copper Ore, Silver Screen

Under Rich Earth

January 30, 2008 Weblog:

Rambo!

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An interesting treatment in Reason traces the political ins and outs of Sylvester Stallone's Rambo franchise. In light of the fact that Rambo fights alongside US-funded Mujahideen in Rambo III, this excerpt is mildly amusing.

the word "Iraq" appears nowhere in the movie, and neither do "Al Qaeda," "Islam," "9/11," or "bin Laden." The writer/director/actor told Ain't It Cool News that he did this because "the idea of Rambo dealing with Al-Qaeda, etc. would be an insult to our American forces that are actually dying trying to rid the world of this cancer. To have at the end of a 90 minute movie the character of Rambo seizing Osama bin Laden in a choke hold then dragging him into the Oval Office then tossing him in the President's lap declaring 'The world is now safe, Chief' would be a bit insulting." I don't doubt Stallone's sincerity, though World War II-era GIs didn't seem to mind the fact that Superman, Captain America, and the rest were fighting alongside them in the comic books. Personally, I wouldn't have minded seeing some of the Afghan heroes of Rambo III return as villains in Rambo IV, but that might push the franchise into areas that Stallone would rather leave alone.

October 31, 2007 Weblog:

Artists Against Apartheid.

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Part of the 5th international week of action against the apartheid wall, initiated by the Palestinian Grassroots Anti-Apartheid Wall Campaign, to oppose Israeli occupation and ethnic cleansing and to support the movement for boycott, divestment and sanctions.

Leading up to ‘Palestinian Perspectives’, an evening of film screenings at the Cinéma du Parc in Montreal on November 29th, to commemorate 60 years of occupation and to celebrate the Palestinian voice. Featuring cutting edge cultural projects from Montreal & internationally, uniting in expression against Israeli Apartheid.

Performances by:

* Lubo Alexandrov: A Bulgarian-born guitarist, composer and singer, Alexandrov has developed a unique musical style, merging Bulgarian, Turkish and Roma musical traditions. Recipient of the 2007 Juno Music Award for the ‘Best World Album’. http://www.luboalexandrov.com

* Valerie Khayat: Poet, singer songwriter, Khayat has been active in folk, poetry and spoken word circles since 2004. She released her first book of poetry, ”The Road to Vesper”, and her first full length album, ”Resonance in Blue”, in 2007. http://www.myspace.com/valeriekhayat

* Kalmunity Vibe Collective members:

Jason Selman: Performance poet & musician
Mohamed Mehdi: Singer songwriter, poet.
Phenix: Hip-hop artist, poet of the Haitian diaspora.

* Ehab Lotayef: Writer, photographer, poet, activist and engineer.

* DJ Kandis: Middle Eastern, international beats, music from DJ Kandis.

Screening two films from the ‘Beyond Blue & Gray’ documentary project of Eyes Infinite Films, with an introduction by series producer Nirah Shirazipour:

» continue reading "Artists Against Apartheid."

September 3, 2007 Weblog:

Tadamon! Solidarity Night.

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A cultural benefit event for Tadamon! Montreal...

Friday, September 7th, 8pm
La Sala Rossa
4848 St. Laurent
Montreal.
Entrance: $5-15

Tadamon!

* Montreal Launch of the film ‘Roads Through Palestine’:

Screening / Launch of a film by Brett Story, with a piano score composed by Stefan Christoff. A cinematic journey through the roads of occupation and resistance in the West Bank of Palestine.

Including performances from.

» continue reading "Tadamon! Solidarity Night."

March 24, 2007 Weblog:

300, take II

Here's a letter I sent to the two corporate-owned alt-weeklies in Montreal. The Mirror didn't print it, and while I confess I haven't picked up the Hour yet, I'm not holding my breath.

* * *

Dear Hour,

During a visit to New York last week, I went to see the movie 300 on its opening day. The consensus among the New Yorkers I spoke to was that the timing of the movie was "septic," its appearance coinciding with the Bush administration building for an attack against Iran (with Harper and the Canadian media close behind). There, it seemed obvious that a movie that depicted pasty-white greeks slicing up their attackers--veiled and masked Africans and Arabs led by an eight-foot tall dark-skinned king wearing eyeliner, facial piercings, and sporting a throaty lisp--was politically and ethically problematic. The racism and homophobia permeating this movie were never in doubt.

» continue reading "300, take II"

March 20, 2007 Weblog:

300

John Powers: "When I found out that 300 had been turned into a film and was due to be released this winter I described its timing as "septic." The comic book was a retelling of the story of Thermopylae - a story that has been used to psych up populations for war in democratic nations since year one of the French revolution. The original story, of warrior idealists protecting Greece against a huge Persian army, was a familiar one from childhood. Making a film from the story I grew up with now, with the US and Iranian administrations playing chicken with nukes and threats of attacks, would seem like tragically bad timing.

» continue reading "300"

March 18, 2007 Arts

Revival House

The many lives of Toronto rep cinemas

March 18, 2007

Megaplex Theatre

by Jessica Allen
March 18, 2007

The Revue Cinema

by Jessica Allen
March 14, 2007 Weblog:

Resistance and Hezbollah

There's a screening on Tuesday in Montreal's Mile End of what looks like a pretty interesting documentary about Hezbollah.

March 13, 2007 Weblog:

Advertising. Free to decide.

ForeignOffice.com has a montage of the advertising and news clips that were part of the background and scenery in the film Children of Men.

(via Greg.org)

February 2, 2007 Weblog:

[film] Iraq in Fragments

Iraq in Fragments, James Longley's three year project, is a beautiful, poignant document that brings the viewer in for a close look at Iraq and it's people.

Coming soon to Calgary, Toronto, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Ottawa, the Peg, and more.

» continue reading "[film] Iraq in Fragments"

January 8, 2007 Weblog:

The Good Shepherd

WSWS film critic Patrick Martin has a decent political critique of De Niro's CIA flick:

Nowhere in the film does De Niro touch on the principal impact of the CIA internationally: the destruction of hundreds of thousands of lives and the trampling on the democratic rights of (literally) hundreds of millions of people in Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America. His Guatemala is a country where the CIA organizes the overthrow of the government without a visible bloodbath. His Congo is an exotic locale for romance and spycraft, not a place of civil war and ruthless struggle for control of vital natural resources.

» continue reading "The Good Shepherd"

April 3, 2006 Business

Canadian Dis-Content

amc_webfp.jpgEzra Winton examines CANCON's role in our film industry and asks why Canadian films are not being shown in Canadian theatres.

Examining CANCON's role in our film industry

October 27, 2005 Arts

"Spiritual Wife" or Single Mother?

bank_fp.jpgDavid Sanderson reviews Banking On Heaven, a film on "Arizona's dirty little secret."

The film Banking On Heaven explores polygamy and religion in Colorado City

August 25, 2005 Arts

The Rising of The Rising

rising2_fp.jpg Why aren't Canadian media paying any attention to international bollywood blockbuster The Rising? Rajiv Rawat explains.

Canadian film critics pass on Bollywood blockbuster's hard look at imperialism

August 6, 2005 Labour

After the Collapse

argen_canton_fp.jpg After the Argentinian economy collapsed, people began to work together, laying the groundwork for a new kind of democracy, says Sean Cain.

A review of Argentina: Hope in Hard Times

June 15, 2005 Arts

What's in a Name?

fiveosamas_fp.jpg In this interview, director Mahmoud Kaabour talks about how 9/11 affected tolerance, the making of "Being Osama", and why he left Canada.

An interview with "Being Osama" director Mahmoud Kaabour

May 23, 2005 Accounts

Hog Town: The Politics of Policing

fantino_fp.jpg Tim Rourke attends the premiere of Min Sook Lee's Hogtown: The Politics of Policing in Toronto.

Directed by Min Sook Lee

March 24, 2005 Environment

Forbidden Film

forbidden_forest_fp.jpg Hillary Lindsay talks to Director Kevin Matthews about his latest documentary, Forbidden Forest

Multinational corporations and New Brunswick's forests

February 20, 2005 Media Analysis

Canada is Legitimizing Suppression of Haitian Democracy: Filmmaker

pina-paup_fp.jpg Dru Oja Jay interviews filmmaker Kevin Pina about Canada's role in the overthrow of Haiti's government.

Kevin Pina slams role of Canadian government, media

November 6, 2004 Arts

Yes Means No!

When international gatherings of corporate executives (mistakenly) ask the Yes Men to be their keynote speakers, they are only too happy to oblige. Max Liboiron watches the results.

The Yes Men dish up artistic critique to straight-faced corporate audiences

November 6, 2004 Labour

Insisting on Working

In this interview, The Take director Avi Lewis talks about the film, and the implications of "inverting the traditional labour action".

An interview with The Take Director Avi Lewis

February 3, 2004 Arts

Lessons for an Audience

Kazimi's Shooting Indians questions "authenticity"
shooting_indians_fp.jpgIn Ali Kazimi's 1997 documentary Shooting Indians, a whole sequence of studying is going on. Kazimi studies Iroquois photographer Jeff Thomas, who is mining the century-old works of white photographer and filmmaker Edward Curtis. The three are transformed.
by Jane Henderson

Kazimi's Shooting Indians explores representations of authenticity

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The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

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