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Iraq war

November 25, 2010 Health

Saskatchewan Uranium, Fallujah's Children

Report on birth defects and cancers in Iraq points to Canadian uranium

February 4, 2007 Weblog:

The ultimate thermodynamic fate of all closed systems

Counterpunch has good pieces about similar dynamics in two different US political movements, environmentalism and anti-war.

Jeffrey St. Clair on the green movement's disconnection from the grassroots, and the unfortunate accuracy of right wing claims that environmentalists are Washington elitists:

To quote Jospeh Heller: Something happened. Somewhere along the line, the environmental movement disconnected with the people, rejected its political roots, pulled the plug on its vibrant and militant tradition. It packed its bags, starched its shirts and jetted to DC, where it became what it once despised: a risk-aversive, depersonalized, hyper-analytical, humorless, access-driven, intolerant, centralized, technocratic, dealmaking, passionless, direct-mailing, lawyer-laden monolith to mediocrity. A monolith with feet of clay.

» continue reading "The ultimate thermodynamic fate of all closed systems"

January 7, 2007 Weblog:

Peacekeeping moves

According to the Times of London, the US is making a move to take over leadership of the UN's Peacekeeping forces. The report speculates that this is part of a strategy for getting US troops out of Iraq.

November 8, 2006 Features

Grilled Cheese and War Crimes

grilled-cheese_fp.jpgChris Arsenault chats with an average 23-year-old who's hoping Canada won't send him back to the US to fight in a war he doesn't believe in.

US soldier who refuses assignment in Iraq claims refugee status in Canada

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The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

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