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Mining

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Penny Trick in Prenter Holler

A family in West Virginia uses a common penny to show how their well water has been contaminated by coal slurry from a local coal mine.

November 11, 2008 Nov 11 by sludgesafety.org
November 11, 2008 Business

Shredding Social Fabric

Company promoters "contaminate" communities in El Salvador

November 10, 2008 Foreign Policy

How Good is Canada’s Word?

Vancouver's Corriente Resources is in deep in Ecuador

November 9, 2008 Business

Blood Cells

Coltan in phones exacerbates crisis in the Congo

November 8, 2008 Opinion

World's Crudest Extraction

At the tar sands they’re digging up dirty fuel

November 7, 2008 Accounts

Vanishing Mountains

Coal mining in Appalachia

November 6, 2008 Original Peoples

Two Ways to Be a Nation

Struggle for control of the "trillion-dollar Sudbury basin"

November 5, 2008 Business

Waste Not, Want Not

One company's fight against Newfoundlanders & Kanaks

November 4, 2008 Business

"Tell Your Investers to Get Out of Here!"

Thai opposition to potash mine becomes community-wide fight

November 3, 2008 Foreign Policy

"Looters’ War" in the Congo

UN report exposes role of Canadian mining companies

November 2, 2008 Labour

Working to Death

Canada's asbestos legacy

November 1, 2008 Original Peoples

A Violation of Algonquin Law

First Nations spearhead resistance to uranium mining

October 23, 2008 Weblog:

Fiftieth anniversary of the Springhill Mine disaster

Today is the 50th anniversary of the third Springhill coal mine disaster.

The CBC has some archival TV footage from the days following the disaster. Seventy four men were killed in the disaster, and 100 miners were trapped underground for almost nine days before being freed.

Prior to the deadly events of 1958, there were two large mine disasters at Nova Scotia's Springhill Mine, one in 1956, and another in 1891.

October 23, 2008 Original Peoples

Canada's Newest Political Prisoners

Indigenous leaders jailed for protesting mining exploration on their lands

October 21, 2008 Environment

OREphaned Mines

The dirty and dangerous legacy of abandoned mines

Canadian Mining in Guatemala

After indigenous peoples' houses were burnt to the ground on land owned by a Vancouver mining company, Avi Lewis gets the company's version of events.

October 16, 2008 Oct 16 2 comments
October 11, 2008 Agriculture

Not In Anyone’s Backyard

Farmers in Alberta growing rural resistance to development

October 4, 2008 Weblog:

Xstrata Faces Strike and Credit Crunch

Bad month for Xstrata, one of the worlds biggest mining groups.

First, CAW Local 599 goes on strike in Timmins, Ontario at the Copper Kidd Metallurgical mine.

Then it's pitch to take over Lonmin, an Anglo-African platinum mine company , fails because of the Credit Crisis.

Xstrata took over Canadian mining company Falconbridge in 2006.

September 25, 2008 Photo Essay

Canadian Mining in Mexico

A close-up look at the impacts of gold mining in San Luis Potosí

September 9, 2008 Weblog:

Golden Opportunity: Mining Against All Costs

Originally published in the Canadian Dimension magazine, September/October 2008 issue

Guided by resource discovery and the heavy-handed rule of the free market, the mining of gold today is “rush-mining,” much as it was a century ago. From the Indigenous lands of Brazil to those in Canada, from Tanzania to the Philippines, whenever gold is discovered, local communities are forced to migrate or attempt to adjust to the new industry. In fact, only eleven per cent of the gold mined worldwide has a practical use in technologies like biomedicine or electronics. Meanwhile, seventy per cent is used for jewellery, with the rest going to investment. Some 35,000 tonnes of gold simply sit in bank vaults around the world, while the environment and innumerable communities are destroyed for its excavation.

Canada plays a huge role in this global market, being home to the largest gold-mining corporations in the world. At the very top reigns Barrick Gold, with others like Goldcorp, Gabriel and Pacific Rim close behind. Collectively they mine on every continent except Antarctica, on which mining is forbidden. But not all gold is excavated by large, corporate colonialists, nor is all of it done abroad. One quarter comes from artisanal or small-scale mining, and minimal but continuous extraction takes place at home (mostly in Ontario and Quebec.)

Countries in Central America and Central Africa have low environmental regulations and worker-safety requirements. They are resource-rich, and are therefore a lucrative destination for Canadian businesses. At home, even though most resource extraction takes place on Indigenous lands, we have relatively strict extraction, land-use and environmental laws, meaning most companies strive to mine offshore.

» continue reading "Golden Opportunity: Mining Against All Costs"

August 8, 2008 Weblog:

Extraction! now available online

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Extraction! Comix Reportage, winner of the 2008 Expozine Alternative Press Award for best English language book & published by the now defunct Cumulus Press, has just been released online as a series of PDFs.

Enjoy!

July 18, 2008 Weblog:

listen online: Indigenous Environmental Network conference in Newe Segobia

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Greetings from the 15th Indigenous Environmental Network gathering to Protect Mother Earth in Newe Segobia (Western Shoshone territory)!

LISTEN ONLINE LIVE HERE: http://www.earthcycles.net/
Info & program here: http://www.ienearth.org/

The first panel of the day - about mining & the extractive industries - is about to get started, with amazing speakers from all over, INCLUDING KI!!! There are 2 smaller workshops on mining today & a field trip tomorrow to Barrick Gold's Cortez gold mine, which is threatening to expand into Horse Canyon, one of the most important Western Shoshone sacred sited.

On that note, the photo is of the Havasupai (Grand Canyon area) delegation at the Longest Walk 2's arrival in DC, The Manifesto for Change, the Resolutions, and the 1978 Longest Walk Manifesto are all now posted as PDF files on the main Longest Walk site: www.longestwalk.org

I'll get more writing up on all these events & issues at some later date...

saludos,
Sandra

July 14, 2008 Business

Meeting Crashers

Anti-mining activists confront shareholders at AGM

July 4, 2008 Accounts

The Road Begins at the Bottom of Your Feet

The Longest Walk 2 speaks out for Mother Earth

June 21, 2008 Weblog:

Goldcorp: Occupation and Resistance in Guatemala (and Beyond)

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Goldcorp Inc.'s Marlin mine in Guatemala has been a hotbed of controversy since locals became aware of the presence of the company (then Glamis Gold) in their municipalities.

Adding weight to the resistance to the mine is a ruling made public on June 9th by the Constitutional Court in Guatemala, which has found eight Articles (or sections thereof) of the Mining Law to be unconstitutional. (full text of the ruling in pdf format).

Among the Articles deemed unconstitutional are 19 and 20, which allow mining activities to start while the corresponding paperwork is still being processed, Articles 21, 24 and 27, which allow mining activity to take place to unlimited depths of the subsurface, Article 75, which allows mining companies to discharge water from their tailings pond directly into surface water, as well as Articles 81 and 86.

Goldcorp has refused to comment on the ruling, as they are in this case unable to use their regular discourse about the importance of the "rule of law."

Lawyers and environmentalists in Guatemala hope that the ruling will prevent Goldcorp from discharging untreated water from the tailings pond at the Marlin Mine (pictured) into local rivers, which the company had planned to begin doing in the next few months.

¡Viva la Consulta Comunitaria, Bajo la Represión!

» continue reading "Goldcorp: Occupation and Resistance in Guatemala (and Beyond)"

June 21, 2008 Accounts

Gravel and Gold

In the Quinte Detention Centre, Indigenous spokespeople compare stories of resistance

June 21, 2008 Weblog:

Sandra's new blog, Tyendinaga & the Longest Walk 2

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Hello fellow Dominion readers!

I thought I'd get this blog started while standing in an office store with free wireless somewhere in North Carolina while the American Indian Movement driver of the trash pick-up crew van sleeps a while in the parking lot...

Thanks to the Dominion for editing & posting 'Gravel and Gold', a narrative article about a prison visit with Tyendinaga Mohawk spokesperson Shawn Brant, Barrick Gold's Pascua Lama project in Diaguita territory ('Chile'), and related issues.

The longer (as in 16-page long) version (PRISON NOTES: They Came First For the Mohawk, and I Didn't Speak Up Because I Wasn't Mohawk...) is available on my other blog.

My most recent article, THE ROAD BEGINS AT THE BOTTOM OF YOUR FEET: The Longest Walk 2 Speaks Out for Mother Earth) is about the Longest Walk 2, the Dooda Desert Rock resistance and uranium mining in the Navajo Nation, the Y-12 National Security Complex & nuclear plant, and the bombing and mining of Western Shoshone territory.

» continue reading "Sandra's new blog, Tyendinaga & the Longest Walk 2"

April 12, 2008 Original Peoples

Consultation Not Consent

The first interview with KI political prisoner Cecilia Begg

April 12, 2008 Weblog:

Barrick Gold blocks booklaunch: Noir Canada

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The book launch for Noir Canada: Pillage, corruption et criminalité en Afrique, edited by Alain Denault and the Collectif Ressources d'Afrique out of Montréal, was a cancelled yesterday when the authors and publishers (Édition Écosociété) received letters from a law firm representing Barrick Gold.

The letters alledgedly refer to apparent inaccuracies in the book, more particularly around the representation of Barrick's role at Bulyanhulu, in Tanzania, where more than 50 small scale miners were buried alive in 1996.

Barrick has also sued The Guardian and The Observer over articles that they published about the Bulyanhulu massacre.

Noir Canada is about the role of Canadian companies in Africa, which operate with the "unfailing help of the Canadian government."

The list of corporate abuses is long: advantageous mining contracts in the DRC, partnerships with arms dealers and mercenaries in the Great Lakes region, miners buried alive in Tanzania, an "involuntary genocide" by poisoning in Mali, brutal expropriations in Ghana, using people from the Ivory Coast for pharmaceutical testing, devastating hydroelectric projects in Senegal, the savage privatization of the railway system in West Africa...

I sure hope that Écosociété goes ahead and releases the book...

» continue reading "Barrick Gold blocks booklaunch: Noir Canada"

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The Dominion is a monthly paper published by an incipient network of independent journalists in Canada. It aims to provide accurate, critical coverage that is accountable to its readers and the subjects it tackles. Taking its name from Canada's official status as both a colony and a colonial force, the Dominion examines politics, culture and daily life with a view to understanding the exercise of power.

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